DOT partners with advocacy group to improve Sunset Park

 

BROOKLYN -The New York City Department of Transportation has been partnering with Uprose, a Sunset Park-based advocacy group, for the past two years on a new project to improve the neighborhood.

The goal is to improve connections between the residential and commercial neighborhood, as well as the industrial and recreational waterfront.

Climate action requires ‘local brilliance,’ Yeampierre tells YESS summit

When more than 300,000 people marched in the streets of New York City during the People’s Climate March, in September 2014, Elizabeth Yeampierre, a co-organizer of the event, made sure that young people of color stood at the front of the line.

'Our Power Puerto Rico', la campaña que busca colaborar con la reconstrucción de la isla

Activistas y organizaciones de Nueva York trabajan para recolectar materiales sustentables que sirvan en las zonas en donde el huracán María causó mayor devastación.

Some Sunset Park Locals Fear A 'Privileged Minority' Would Benefit From Industry City Rezoning

At a meeting Tuesday in front of the City Planning Commission, developers behind Industry Cityin Sunset Park argued for a proposed rezoning that would bring high-end commercial development and a luxury hotel to the waterfront—expanding a so-called "innovation economy hub."

These efforts dovetail with the city's plans for the Sunset Park waterfront, but some locals see only a hipster behemoth threatening to permanently displace local residents, small businesses, and heavy manufacturing jobs.

Fans and critics speak out about Industry City's development plan

Industry City's owners have big plans for development.

Two hotels. Academic facilities. Large stores.

The Sunset Park waterfront manufacturing and office complex must be rezoned in order for them to carry out their plans, which would add about 1.27 million square feet of space to the historic complex.
 

Rezoning of Sunset Park's Industry City complex is on the horizon

Industry City’s next phase of expansion is now officially set to move forward. The owners of the 16-building complex in Sunset Park will formally enter into the city’s rezoning process tomorrow. They will present their plans at a public meeting to be held at the City Planning Commission, as part of a pre-certification process for such rezonings.

Based on the feedback acquired at the meeting, the developers will create an environmental impact statement. If the city approves the findings from that study, the project will then officially enter into the Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP), most likely in the Spring of 2018, and then spend another six-seven months in that public review process, if it is approved.

Imagine a Puerto Rico Recovery Designed by Puerto Ricans

IT’S TOUGH TO shock Puerto Ricans. Not after the presidential paper-towel toss. Not after Donald Trump repeatedly attacked San Juan’s mayor for daring to fight for her people’s lives. Not after he threatened to skip out on the island in its hour of need at the earliest excuse.

Still, the fact that the House-approved relief package contains $5 billion in loans for the island, rather than grants, is a special kind of cruelty. Because on an island already suffering under an un-payable $74 billion debt (and another $49 billion in unfunded pension obligations), Puerto Ricans understand all too well that debt is not relief. On the contrary, it is a potent tool of perpetual impoverishment and control from which relief is urgently needed.

Latinos Leading On Climate Change

A recent study by Yale Climate Change Communications found that U.S. Latinos are significantly more worried about climate change than other groups and are willing to take action. They also tend to be more vulnerable to air pollution and extreme weather because of where they live and work.

Brooklyn organization plans to sail to Puerto Rico to bring supplies

 

BROOKLYN -Millions of people remain without power and in dire need of supplies after Hurricane Maria tore through the Caribbean.

Members of the organization UPROSE are hoping to bring some help with a ship that is headed down the coast today.

UPROSE's trip is underway as its heads down to Norfolk, Virginia with plans to hopefully end up in Puerto Rico.

Cómo construir un Puerto Rico que respete la justicia medioambiental

Elizabeth Yeampierre, destacada activista boricua, quiere que la recuperación de la isla tenga en consideración a los más pobres, normalmente más afectados por la contaminación y los desastres naturales.

What Would Amazon’s Arrival in Sunset Park Mean for Locals — and City Taxpayers?

Ever since the online retail behemoth announced this month that it was seeking a location for a second headquarters — and asking cities to “bid” for its presence — Sunset Park’s waterfront has been floated as a potential contender. The New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) has already begun the formal process of crafting a proposal, and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce president Andrew Hoan have launched a “Brooklyn Prime” campaign to land the prize for their borough. One likely site: Industry City, a 6.5 million–square-foot industrial complex that Jamestown Properties, the real estate company behind Manhattan’s posh Chelsea Market, has worked to make into a poster project for developers working to rebrand Brooklyn’s southwestern shoreline as “Innovation Coast.”

Activists to mobilize for 5th anniversary of Sandy

As the fifth anniversary of Superstorm Sandy approaches next month, climate change activists are planning what organizers are calling a mass mobilization to demand that elected officials pay closer attention to the potential devastation brought on by drastic weather events like hurricanes.

Hear From City Council Candidates Ahead Of Next Week's Election

SUNSET PARK, BROOKLYN — Sunset Parkers have another chance to hear from the candidates vying to represent them on the New York City Council ahead of next week's primary election.

UPROSE, a nonprofit focused on climate change and racial justice that is very active in Sunset Park, is hosting a candidate forum on Wednesday with six of the candidates for office. It will take place at Marie Heim of Sunset Park, on 46th Street and Fourth Avenue, from 6 to 8 p.m.

Activist Movement Exposes Link Between Gentrification and Climate Change

Climate change is a global issue that affects us all, but mainly racial minorities and low-income communities bear the brunt of its immediate effects. The environmental movement as many people know it has been white, old and rich which many see as part of its ineffectiveness and irrelevance. In response, the climate justice movement has emerged and aims to break down silos that have divided communities in order to achieve real substantial change. Underrepresented groups are taking action to unite around economic and social issues in order to ensure true government accountability, inclusion and effective organizing.

On August 3, 2017, UPROSE, Brooklyn's oldest Latino-community based organization, held its sixth annual Climate Justice Youth Summit that gathered approximately 750 young people of color from across the country to talk about the intersection of civil and environmental rights. The event included a series of small workshops called learning circles where participants engaged in discussions about how climate change influences cultural topics like gentrification and policing. The activities throughout the day culminated with a keynote address from actor and activist Danny Glover.

Young People of Color Are Leading America’s Climate Justice Movement

Youths from diverse backgrounds gathered at New York's Climate Justice Youth Summit to focus on enacting local policies that combat climate change and protect communities of color threatened by its effects.

More than 500 youth of color gathered in Manhattan on Thursday, August 3 for the annual Climate Justice Youth Summit. When the Summit began six years ago, many of those in attendance might have never heard of the phrase "climate justice," which refers to the climate crisis and racial justice. Now, it's one of the nation's largest gathering working at that intersection.

These youth of color are organizing to address climate change

On Thursday morning, hundreds of young people of color received an urgent message: they couldn’t afford not to be leaders in the fight against climate change.

“We are descendants of colonization and slavery. You are the children of extraction. Extraction is now taking over the planet,” Elizabeth Yeampierre, executive director of UPROSE, said. “I want to see those fists up!’”

At the Climate Justice Youth Summit on Aug. 3 in New York City, speakers focused on the impact of climate change on people of color and called on youth of color to lead the fight against climate crises in their communities. The daylong event was the sixth of its kind hosted by UPROSE, a Brooklyn-based organization that promotes sustainability and cultural expression.

At a Climate Justice Fashion Show, the Kids Prove They're Gonna Be All Right

There’s not a ton of room for environmental optimism these days—optimism in general seems to have taken a leave of absence in the Trump age—but that wasn’t the case at the 6th annual Climate Justice Youth Summit (CJYS), hosted by UPROSE, a Latino community-based organization based in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. The summit billed itself as “the largest gathering of young people of color discussing the future of climate change in the country,” and around midday, hundreds of attendees aged six to 18 cheerfully packed tight into a light-filled chapel in Morningside Heights’ Union Theological Seminary for one of the day’s highlights: a fashion show.